Archive - September 2019

Calling A DX Station When QRP

on-air-radio
QRP operators have a tough time out there in the pile up, not only are the high power stations loud and often wide but with Solar Minimum with SFI at 66 or just a little higher, every Watt of power the QRP’er uses has to be used wisely and with much greater skill than everyone else. 
 
So from the DXpedition’s point of view how can you hone your skill into getting your call into the log. Firstly, most of the DX Teams are trained and thrive on pulling weak signals out of the noise and your callsign is the only thing the team wants to hear at this point.
 
Listen to the band, find a clear spot in the pile up either using your band scope or using VFO B, this will give you that edge. In any pile-up most callers will be at the bottom or top of the listening range so find somewhere in the middle that will allow you to be heard.
 
Just use your callsign when calling, it is very easy to cause harm in a pile up and slow the DX station down, if the DX operator loses concentration his Q rate goes down which helps no one, so resist from using /QRP. If the DXpedition can hear /QRP he can hear your callsign, once the DX has had to return “/QRP?” You have already lost his Q rate, concentration to boot. All he needs is your callsign.
 
Here is what the Radio Regulations say:

Article 19 of the Radio Regulations (2016) state –

19.45 § 21 1) The twenty-six letters of the alphabet, as well as digits in the cases specified below, may be used to form call signs. Accented letters are excluded.

19.46 2) However, the following combinations shall not be used as call signs:

19.47 a) combinations which might be confused with distress signals or with other signals of a similar nature;

19.48 b) combinations in Recommendation ITU-RM.1172-0 that are reserved for the abbreviations to be used in the radiocommunication services. (WRC-15)

Recommendation M.1172 which is primarily a Maritime Mobile Service document says –

     1 The series of groups listed in this Annex range from QOA to QUZ.

 
So, it is clear the Q operating codes do not form part of the call sign. By just using your Callsign, in a clear part of the DX operators listening range will stand you a much better chance of getting in the log, this will then also help the DX station work you and keep his concentration and Q rate and help others get in the log too!

NOT IN LOG? Here is what to do.

NIL-1
Please note that I do not accept “Busted call” emails or “Not In Log” emails. You will not get a reply!
If you have a case where you find that your call is incorrect or missing from the log simply click “NOT IN LOG?” button and fill in the form on the OQRS. 
All such inquiries will be sent to a work queue for checking. So you should not be sending me emails. 
VERY IMPORTANT – READ the Last QSO in the log: date and time. If your QSO is after that… WAIT for a log update.

MD/OP2D Isle of Man

ON6NB 2


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NB DX Team is on the road again
Callsign : MD/OP2D
Date: 21-27 September 2019
Location : Isle of Man

Team :
ON4ANN – ERIK ( TEAMLEADER AND SSB-OPERATOR)
ON4CCV – ERIK ( SSB – OPERATOR )
ON4CKM – CEDRIC ( SSB – OPERATOR )
ON6MI – RUDI ( SSB – OPERATOR )
ETIENNE – ONL
ON4DTO – ANDRE (SSB-DIGI)
ON4DCU – Patrick (SSB OPERATOR)
ON2BDJ – Willy (SSB OPERATOR)
ON4AAQ Luc (CW OPERATOR)
ON5CD Yvo (SSB-DIGI OPERATOR)
ON8CW Walter (DIGI OPERATOR)

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QSL Information

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OQRS (Online QSL Request System) 

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DX Commander M0XXT QSL

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